Autism and Writing: Writing in a Network

Autism and Writing: My Struggle “I am a terrible writer.” That was my message to myself and was it any wonder because that was the message of others to me. So while I cruised through my math classes, I held on for dear life in my English courses. Okay, in fairness, I was an

Compensating for Autism: Different Ways to Amazing Days

Have you ever tried something and thought you just couldn't pull it off? That in spite of your best efforts, you just weren't progressing? Yeah, me too! And it is crazy frustrating. Enter my blog, Her Autism. Though I enjoy writing, it really challenges me. When I first started blogging, I

6 Factors In Deciding Whether To Disclose Your Autism Diagnosis

So you may be thinking about seeking an autism diagnosis, or maybe you have just been diagnosed. This diagnosis maybe came as a "holy-cow-how-did-this-happen?" kind of shock. (I kept wondering how in the world I was just being diagnosed at the age of 44!) Maybe in addition to being a

Hugs and Autism: I Want to Help U Get Better

Hugs and Autism. Just the two words together seem overwhelming. Hugging presents such a difficult topic for many families in which someone is autistic. While some researchers are starting to try to explain it, it remains a tough subject. I know that when many women envision starting a family, they

A Guide to Girls and Autism

As a “girl” with autism, the subject of girls and autism is dear to my heart. In spite of the questions I get about girls and autism, until now, I hadn’t prepared an adequate response. I simply told people what it was like for me and gave a really general answer. So, I

Are the Meltdowns of Someone Who Has Autism Really Abnormal?

I think, probably controversially, that meltdowns are not abnormal reactions to what autistic people are experiencing. I believe that some experiences of those with autism are so outside the expectations or experiences of those around them who do not have autism as to be considered minor or unimportant. As a result, we deem the behavior that makes

Autism and School: Down with the BLURB!!

School was hard for me. Super hard. It got easier, much easier, once I reached college, but the first twelve years - rough. Autism and School I made it clear through law school, but every moment of that process was tough. As I have already pointed out in one of my posts, for every text book

The Counterintuitive Nature of Autism

Counterintuitive - my word to describe dealing with autism. Counterintuitive. I want to open this discussion with a super simple example. When my autistic daughter was an infant, her muscle tone (or hypotonia) was so low that she struggled to eat. (Lots of kiddos with autism also have these types of issues. It is not necessarily a

Comorbidity: Life with Autism and Its Closest “Friends”

Comorbidity I so dislike like this name. How gloomy and doomy can one word be? Why did we choose such dreadful words to label issues faced by people who are already facing so much? (Speaking of names, don’t even get me started on Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD). Who thought it would be okay to

Coming Home: The Clarity of Knowing My Confusion Stemmed from Autism

People frequently ask me whether I am glad I was diagnosed with autism, whether I am glad I know. One day, my daughter Emma spoke with my mom about my diagnosis. She later told me that my mom kept saying, “If we had known, things would have been different.” That sentiment exactly mirrors how I feel.

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