Present Giving in Autistic/NT Relationships: Nail It Every Time!

Let’s talk about autism gifts for adults and teens with autism and neurotypical gifts for adults who don’t have autism. Or better yet, let's don't assume anything based on whether someone is autistic or neurotypical, and let’s talk about gift giving in neurodiverse relationships. Because, gift giving is super important.  In fact,

Autism and Accountability: How to Know When to Hold an Autistic Child Accountable

Autism and Accountability It can be tough to determine those things for which it is okay to hold someone accountable. It can be especially difficult in relationships between autists and neuortypical folks. Parents ask whether/when, they can hold their autistic child accountable. In response to these questions, I created this post and

Hugs and Autism: What To Do When One Person NEEDS a Hug and the Other Does NOT

Hugs and Autism. Just the two words together seem overwhelming. Hugging presents such a difficult topic for many families in which someone is autistic. While some researchers are starting to try to explain it, it remains a tough subject. I know that when many women envision starting a family, they

A Guide to Girls and Autism

As a “girl” with autism, the subject of girls and autism is dear to my heart. In spite of the questions I get about girls and autism, until now, I hadn’t prepared an adequate response. I simply told people what it was like for me and gave a really general answer. So, I

What Girls and Women with Autism Want to Hear and Why

"You are enough. Just you." So simple, right? We sometimes say it, but do we really mean that? Because it doesn't count if you don't mean it. In the context of girls and women with autism we lose sight of this seemingly simple principle with a regularity that is stunning. In fact, it happens so easily

Are the Meltdowns of Someone Who Has Autism Really Abnormal?

I think, probably controversially, that meltdowns are not abnormal reactions to what autistic people are experiencing. I believe that some experiences of those with autism are so outside the expectations or experiences of those around them who do not have autism as to be considered minor or unimportant. As a result, we deem the behavior that makes